nowyoukno:

Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

nowyoukno:

Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

nprglobalhealth:

Fist Bumps Pass Along Fewer Germs Than Handshakes
A few weeks ago, we took a look at nonverbal greetings around the world. In Japan, they bow. Ethiopian men touch shoulders. And some in the Democratic Republic of the Congo do a type of head knock.
But the American fist bump stood apart from the rest.
Knocking knuckles was the only greeting we could find that signaled both victory and equality; neither bumper has the upper hand, so to speak.
But of many of our readers pointed out that bumping fists may have another superior quality: it’s cleaner than a traditional handshake.
Now scientists in Wales have confirmed what these astute reader’s already knew. You’re much less likely to pass along bacteria when you bump fists than shake hands or high-five, biologists reported Monday in the American Journal of Infection Control.
The study was small. Only five pairs of people bumped, shook and slapped palms. But the findings were clear-cut. A moderately strong handshake transferred more than five times as much Escherichia coli bacteria onto a recipients hand than a fist bump, biologist David Whitworth and his colleague at Aberystwyth University found.
And that strong, sturdy handshake your grandpa taught you was even dirtier. It transferred nearly 10 times more bacteria than a fist bump.
The high-five fell between the two other greetings. Slapping palms, on average, passed along twice as much bacteria as the fist bump.
Continue reading.
Photo: Which greeting is the cleanest? The quicker the touch, the less likely many microbes will make the jump. (Ryan Kellman)

nprglobalhealth:

Fist Bumps Pass Along Fewer Germs Than Handshakes

A few weeks ago, we took a look at nonverbal greetings around the world. In Japan, they bow. Ethiopian men touch shoulders. And some in the Democratic Republic of the Congo do a type of head knock.

But the American fist bump stood apart from the rest.

Knocking knuckles was the only greeting we could find that signaled both victory and equality; neither bumper has the upper hand, so to speak.

But of many of our readers pointed out that bumping fists may have another superior quality: it’s cleaner than a traditional handshake.

Now scientists in Wales have confirmed what these astute reader’s already knew. You’re much less likely to pass along bacteria when you bump fists than shake hands or high-five, biologists reported Monday in the American Journal of Infection Control.

The study was small. Only five pairs of people bumped, shook and slapped palms. But the findings were clear-cut. A moderately strong handshake transferred more than five times as much Escherichia coli bacteria onto a recipients hand than a fist bump, biologist David Whitworth and his colleague at Aberystwyth University found.

And that strong, sturdy handshake your grandpa taught you was even dirtier. It transferred nearly 10 times more bacteria than a fist bump.

The high-five fell between the two other greetings. Slapping palms, on average, passed along twice as much bacteria as the fist bump.

Continue reading.

Photo: Which greeting is the cleanest? The quicker the touch, the less likely many microbes will make the jump. (Ryan Kellman)

oceansoftheworld:

Whale Shark 
libutron:

Helmet Vanga  (Helmetbird)
The Helmet Vanga, scientifically named Euryceros prevostii (Passeriformes - Vangidae), is a peculiar bird, endemic to Madagascar, impressive for its large, deep and pale blue bill, contrasting with the black body and the chestnut back, rump and central tail feathers. 
Helmet vangas are shy birds that frequently join mixed-species flocks with other large vangas and feed on a range of invertebrates including large insects, snails, spiders and crabs as well as lizards.
Because Euryceros prevostii is only known from primary forest, generally below 800 m, where it is uncommon and patchy in distribution, restricted to the northern part of the humid evergreen forests of eastern Madagascar, the species is regarded as Vulnerable.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Giovanni Mari | Locality: Masoala National Park, Madagascar

libutron:

Helmet Vanga  (Helmetbird)

The Helmet Vanga, scientifically named Euryceros prevostii (Passeriformes - Vangidae), is a peculiar bird, endemic to Madagascar, impressive for its large, deep and pale blue bill, contrasting with the black body and the chestnut back, rump and central tail feathers. 

Helmet vangas are shy birds that frequently join mixed-species flocks with other large vangas and feed on a range of invertebrates including large insects, snails, spiders and crabs as well as lizards.

Because Euryceros prevostii is only known from primary forest, generally below 800 m, where it is uncommon and patchy in distribution, restricted to the northern part of the humid evergreen forests of eastern Madagascar, the species is regarded as Vulnerable.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Giovanni Mari | Locality: Masoala National Park, Madagascar

sundxwn:

Summer Home by Marc Adamus
ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts
did-you-kno:

Magpie birds mourn the passing of their loved ones through rituals similar to funerals.  Some have been viewed laying ‘wreaths’ of grass alongside roadside corpses.
Source

did-you-kno:

Magpie birds mourn the passing of their loved ones through rituals similar to funerals.  Some have been viewed laying ‘wreaths’ of grass alongside roadside corpses.

Source

libutron:

Fringed Campion
Commonly named Fringed Campion, Silene polypetala (Caryophyllaceae) is beautiful woodland flower, very rare, only found in a few spots in Florida and Georgia in the United States, where it is regarded as Endangered species.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Julie Tew | Locality: Angus Gholson Nature Park, Chattahoochee, Florida, US

libutron:

Fringed Campion

Commonly named Fringed Campion, Silene polypetala (Caryophyllaceae) is beautiful woodland flower, very rare, only found in a few spots in Florida and Georgia in the United States, where it is regarded as Endangered species.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Julie Tew | Locality: Angus Gholson Nature Park, Chattahoochee, Florida, US

thetallblacknerd:

I loved this speech so fucking much, just agree with all of it